Tag: dramaturgy

Do You Know The Difference Between Fabula And Plot?

Do You Know The Difference Between Fabula And Plot?

Two fundamental elements of any story are the fabula and the plot.
Without these two elements, it is not possible to create a narrative. It is from here, therefore, that every writer starts to construct their narrative.

What are the Fabula and Plot?

The fabula is the narration of the events in the order of their logical-temporal sequence.

It is, therefore, clear that the fabula is a fact; it represents what happens (and things happen in chronological order, causes before effects).

An example of a fabula is the Divine Comedy. Dante‘s journey is essentially linear. Each stage is necessary to access the next scenario and set the events in the correct chronological order.

On the other side, there is the plot. The plot is when the author can establish how the individual events of the story are to take place. In other words, it is the mode we choose to narrate the facts.

The author is, therefore, free to choose which way to tell the facts.

There are different types of plot

  • resolution plot: the transformative action concludes a concrete crisis (a meeting, a marriage, …);
  • revelation plot: the characters carry out a revelation process, increasing their knowledge or consciousness.
  • unified plot: in which the plot unfolds over successive, closely connected episodes;
  • episodic plot: individual episodes present weak links to one another while carrying a single narrative corpus.

Plot and fabula: where to start?

Some writers prefer to start and define the fabula and then concentrate on the plot. This allows them first to define the events and then think about how to present them to the reader.

In other cases, on the contrary, fabula and plot do not coincide. To make stories more compelling and exciting, authors often disregard the chronological order of the fabula and construct the plot of their texts with time lags.

Two narrative techniques allow you to reverse the story’s events: analepsis and prolepsis.

  • The analepsis (or flashback or retrospection) consists of a jump back in time, whereby what happened previously is recounted.
  • The prolepsis (or flashforward or anticipation) is the opposite technique to flashback, which consists of a leap forward in time, whereby one anticipates what will happen in the future.

When the plot does not coincide with the fabula, it is up to the reader to reconstruct the chronological order of events after reading through an operation of personal abstraction. By reading the story, they will mentally put the pieces back together, restoring their logical-chronological succession.

bibisco can help you to choose the fabula and the plot

As anticipated, the fabula and the plot are among the two main elements to think about before creating a narrative.
However, the writer has the choice of whether to create a coherence of events or not.
bibisco, thanks to its innovative writing software, helps you in this difficult choice and to identify the events of the fabula so that you can present them in the plot without the risk of forgetting something or confusing the reader.

Dramaturgy Series #6: Fabula and plot- bibisco's architecture of the novel & narrative strands - bibisco blog | useful resources by your novel writing software

Conclusions

When you want to start writing a novel, you should avoid writing without an outline, not knowing the events you want to include in the narrative.

Each author has the freedom to choose the order to present the events narrated in their text: they can describe the events scrupulously following their chronological order, or they can decide to anticipate certain future events or explain past events.

In short, he can organize the succession of their narrative by playing with fabula and plot.

What Is The Story’s Premise? It Is The Safe Compass That Will Guide Your Narrative Into Port

What Is The Story’s Premise? It Is The Safe Compass That Will Guide Your Narrative Into Port

There is a crucial part of writing a novel besides character creation and narrative techniques. It is about the premise.

The premise is a fundamental element of the narrative that should not be overlooked because it represents the compass that guides the narration for the writers.
Let us see what it is about in detail.

What is the premise?

In simple terms, the premise contains the entire novel in just one sentence: conflict and its resolution. The premise is your guide when you write your book: the conclusion must start from conflict.

It is the soul of the story. It is the premise we give ourselves in working out the different scenes, not something the reader/viewer knows beforehand. A common thread of the story to design it better.

How to write the premise?

The greatest difficulty in creating a premise lies in understanding that it is impossible to notice where the premise ends and where stories and characters begin in a well-written story.

No one part must override the others; the whole must blend harmonically.
The premise must be honest, transparent, and forthright.
The premise should be formulated with the “Theme-Conflict-Result” structure. It is essential that the premise be expressed with a cause-and-effect formula and should be constructed according to these three elements, of which the first should suggest the protagonist (i.e., something inherent in his fatal flaw or winning endowment), the second should present a possible conflict, and the third should tell us the outcome.

Premise: some examples

Let us give some well-known examples to understand the premise better.

Let us think of “The Godfather“, a film by Francis Ford Coppola. The film’s premise is “The Godfather: Loyalty to one’s family leads to a life of crime.

On the other hand, Romeo and Juliet’s premise is “Romeo and Juliet: great love conquers even death.

While again, to stay with Shakespeare, Macbeth‘s premise is “ruthless ambition leads to self-destruction.”

Moral of the story and premise: What is the difference?

The premise is not something rationally provable, but it is what the author will argue implicitly throughout the story.

That is why the premise must be something you believe in or have believed in the past long enough to be full of ideas, situations, reflections, and nuances to deal with so that it flows naturally from you.

The moral is what a story might teach us.

The narrative premise, on the other hand, is what the writer wants to demonstrate with their story.

Often the premise is not something you decide at the table before you begin, but something you discover as you design the story, when situations and characters marked by your stylistic fingerprint start to suggest what the story will be about deep down. You may even fully understand your premise only after the first draft.

A princess’s life is in danger and a young man uses his warrior skills to save her and thus defeat the evil force represented by the Galactic Empire.

Star Wars premise

Write your premise with the help of bibisco

Have you ever thought about using an innovative tool that could give you a hand in creating your narrative without making you miss the steps?

bibisco's premise section - What Is The Story's Premise? It Is The Safe Compass That Will Guide Your Narrative Into Port. | bibisco blog useful resources from your novel writing software
bibisco’s premise section

bibisco, with its innovative writing software, can help you with that. Discover this innovative tool’s functions that facilitate you while writing your novel and even your premise.

Conclusions

The premise may sound cliché or a silly little phrase, but it is the element that sums up a good story and hundreds of other similar stories. The whole story must serve the premise, with carefully chosen scenes to support it. The premise makes that series of scenes a unique and coherent story.

Therefore, the premise must be correct, transparent, and truthful so as not to confuse readers while reading the novel and confuse them.

How To Exploit The Power Of Five-sense Descriptions To Create Engaging Stories

How To Exploit The Power Of Five-sense Descriptions To Create Engaging Stories

Often when people talk about starting to write a story, they immediately think about the description of the characters, the events, and the story. We have told a lot about this in our ‘dramaturgy series‘.

Writing an engaging story, however, also involves the talent to evoke emotions through the five-sense descriptions. But how does that work?

What are five-sense descriptions?

A good author must know how to stimulate readers by describing the five senses. Sound, music, images, aromas, and flavors must be present in an engaging story.
Sight and hearing are perhaps the easiest senses to describe. A more difficult task concerns the description of touch, smell, and taste.

How to use the five-sense descriptions in a narrative?

The brain works on impulses of action and reaction. Each action introduced, therefore, corresponds to a reaction.

An author has to learn how to communicate at a distance with the audience, thus using the right words that introduce a specific action and trigger the subsequent reaction. That is why adjectives are essential.

Think about what your brain suggests as you read these words

  • Acrid
  • Pungent
  • Ice cream
  • Torrid
  • Fetid

Similarly, verbs are also valuable helpers.

The trick is to try to describe the sense as minutely as possible.

How can you learn to describe the five senses?

An author who knows how to describe is an author who knows how to observe.

Often, authors fail to include compelling descriptions in their texts because they do not have a clear idea of what they are describing or do not have sufficient linguistic mastery. In these cases, the scenes remain bare, and the characters are not given much depth. The vocabulary used is poor or trivial, and the same expressions are repeated over and over again.

Finally, one has to work hard on one’s vocabulary to enrich it with as many synonyms, adjectives, and verbs as possible.

Examples from fiction: the use of the five sense descriptions

Even in movies, the description of the five senses is fundamental. It’s easy as far as sight and hearing are concerned, but what about the rest?
Think of the film ‘Chocolat‘ with Johnny Depp and Juliette Binoche. The chocolate preparation scenes are shown with infinite care. At the film’s end, you almost want to make yourself a nice cup of chocolate.
Even in Disney’s famous hit ‘Ratatouille‘, the mouse chef is shown intent on cooking. The sound study was so careful and detailed that it made your mouth water.

Don’t tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.

Anton Chekhov

Use bibisco to choose the correct words

bibisco comes with innovative writing software that lets you keep track of the words you want to use to describe the five senses. You can also create an outline so that you don’t lose the thread of the descriptions and risk repeating yourself in the story.

How To Exploit The Power Of Five-sense Descriptions To Create Engaging Stories -  bibisco's main character section - bibisco blog | useful resources by your novel writing software

Conclusions

In this article, we learned how to exploit the power of five-sense descriptions to create engaging stories: it allows you to reach out to your readers and get them involved.
However, you must have a good vocabulary and learn to observe and use synonyms. In this, bibisco supports you and helps you during the writing of your novel!

Why Is The Novel’s Setting Essential To Craft A Story That Your Readers Will Love

Why Is The Novel’s Setting Essential To Craft A Story That Your Readers Will Love

Each story takes place in a specific place at a specific time. The characters move in that environment and are profoundly influenced by it: in the way they behave, speak, and think.

This is why is the novel’s setting essential to craft a story that your readers will love.

What is the setting of a story?

The setting of a story is the context, the environment that provides the backdrop for the story’s events.
It includes customs, traditions, costumes, and expressions that depend on geographical location and change over the years.

Something that may fit in Europe may not be told in Asia or must be slightly modified for America.

Similarly, what was accepted in 2010 in a metropolis like New York, could be considered outrageous in 1800 in a small town in the United States.

The setting is what varies over the years and centuries, and the author must pay close attention to.

Why pay attention to the setting?

In a previous article, we talked about “Magical realism“. This narrative technique allows you to introduce magical objects in a real context. A narrative device like this fascinates the readers so that they accept it almost as if that object were part of everyday reality.

Unlike this, however, an incorrect setting does not engage the reader. On the contrary, it risks confusing and even irritating him.

Inserting customs and current expressions into a 500-year-old setting seems more like a mistake than a narrative technique. In these cases, it appears that the author has not thought carefully about the setting and everything that characterizes it.

Whoever reads a story is predisposed to believe what is told in it, even if it is a fantasy story. In the narrative jargon, this is the “suspension of disbelief“. It is that glimmer of doubt inherent in the reader that opens when you tell something totally inconsistent.

Setting equals trust

If you don’t want to lose this trust that the reader is giving to your novel, you have to write a coherent story.

For example, if you tell a detective story set in the nineteenth century, you can’t solve the case with DNA analysis.

In the same way, if your main character is a street kid, you can’t make him express himself as an academic.

When the readers read, they become immersed in the story as if in a dream and let go.

Reading, however, of inconsistent elements you don’t explain in the story causes accidents that awaken your reader from the enchantment of reading and alienate him.

In fact, while we read a novel, we are insane – bonkers. we believe in the existence of people who aren’t there, we hear their voices, we watch the battle of Borodino with them, we may even become Napoleon. Sanity returns (in most cases) when the book is closed.

Ursula K. Le Guin

bibisco: an essential tool for your setting

As you’ve seen, it’s not easy to figure out the setting of your novel. On the contrary, doing it is crucial for so many reasons.
bibisco, thanks to its innovative novel writing software, helps you understand your novel’s setting. In this way, the author identifies the expressions and traditions to describe and include in the characters’ dialogues.

bibisco's setting section - The novel's setting is essential to craft a story that your readers will love -
bibisco’s setting section

Conclusions

Defining the setting, understanding it, and applying it correctly are essential to crafting a story that your readers will love.
Everything you include in your story must be consistent with the setting to avoid confusing readers but engage them in a coherent, linear, deep narrative.